Houthis Say UK Draft Resolution for Hodeidah is 'Nonbinding’

Houthis Say UK Draft Resolution for Hodeidah is 'Nonbinding’

Wednesday, 21 November, 2018 - 08:45
Houthis in Sanaa. (AFP)
Sanaa - Asharq Al-Awsat
Yemeni Houthi militias, ahead of a scheduled visit by UN Special Envoy Martin Griffiths to their stronghold, Sanaa, lambasted the draft resolution for halting military operations in Hodeidah presented by the UK to the United Nations Security Council.

The Iran-backed putschists said that the draft resolution in its current wording and conditions is nonbinding.

Despite being relieved by international efforts easing the push of Yemeni army forces against coup ranks in Hodeidah, Houthi strongman and leader Abdulmalik Badreddine al-Houthi said his group was hoping for a complete lifting of the siege surrounding the militias and a lenient arrangement which allows an unrestricted flow of Iranian arms into insurgency areas.

The UK proposal demands the militants halt all missile launches and drone attacks against Yemen’s neighbors, namely Saudi Arabia, added to the removal of all obstacles inhibiting the delivery of humanitarian aid.

Addressing the crowd at a rally held in observance of the birth of Islam’s prophet Mohammed (pbuh), Houthi reaffirmed the coupists are committed to a wider sectarian project guided by Iran’s Khomeini ideology, saying any other option is equivalent to apostasy.

Following in the footsteps of Khomeini-styled mass rallies, Houthis have employed coercive measures and threats to bring out Sanaa residents to participate in coup-styled events and rallies. The group is very focused on putting out a bellicose display of sectarian authoritarianism, local sources, speaking under the conditions of anonymity, told Asharq Al-Awsat.

Among the threats that faced civilians, who did not wish to attend Houthi marches, was the risk of losing their jobs at coup-controlled public institutions.

Despite Yemen’s ailing economy, Houthis have allocated over YER65 billion (some $108 million) to organize a collective display of power across the war-torn country’s governorates and districts controlled by the Iran-backed putschists.

Sanaa walls were covered in posters showing Houthi fighters killed in combat and painted slogans glorifying the coup.

Sources reported Houthi militants ordering Sanaa locals to paint their porches, house facades, and neighborhood streets green, the group’s trademark color.

Public schools were also dragged into holding massing crowds in their courtyards.

At the rallies, Houthi officials and leaders would rile up the crowds with sectarian mottos to squeeze out more funds and fresh young recruits.

The group’s collapsing ranks across multiple fronts has forced them to look for additional sources of fighters and money to finance their war efforts.

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