Iraq: ‘Abadi-Hakim’ Electoral Alliance Collapses

Iraq: ‘Abadi-Hakim’ Electoral Alliance Collapses

Wednesday, 31 January, 2018 - 07:00
Iraq’s Prime Minister Haider Al-Abadi speaks at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington, DC, on April 16, 2015. (AFP Photo/Jim Watson)
Baghdad - Asharq Al-Awsat
The electoral Nasr al-Iraq alliance between Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi and the Hikma Movement headed by Ammar al-Hakim collapsed over “technical” issues, two weeks after the withdrawal of Popular Mobilization Forces’ al-Fath (Conquest) from a similar alliance with the PM.

A statement issued by the Hikma Movement said: “The Nasr coalition and the Hikma Movement have decided to run in the parliamentary elections in two lists based on a mutual agreement reached between the two parties over technical issues.”

It added that the two sides might set up an alliance following the elections to form a national government that meets “the ambitions and hopes of the Iraqi people.”

Explaining what technical reasons have led to the quick withdrawals from Abadi’s Nasr coalition, an Iraqi politician told Asharq Al-Awsat on condition of anonymity: “All parties that signed an electoral pact with Abadi later discovered that joining such alliance will make them lose in the upcoming elections.”

He said that Abadi was not prepared to join the electoral battle, but was forced to announce a list following immense political and even religious pressures.

The source added that parties allied with Abadi realized that the coming victory would only be in the interest of the prime minister.

“Those parties discovered they will fail in the upcoming elections after Abadi placed several conditions on parties wishing to sign an electoral pact with his coalition,” the source said, adding that the prime minister’s “cake does not satisfy all parties.”

On Tuesday, a source said seven parties have already withdrawn from Abadi’s al-Nasr coalition

State of Law Coalition MP Rehab Abouda told Asharq Al-Awsat: “It remains clear there was a rush to join Abadi’s coalition, which includes many parties and entities that have nothing in common except the hope to receive the highest number of parliamentary seats.”

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